[SportMed] MEDICAL: CONDITIONS: CONCUSSIONS : REFERENCE TOOLS : GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS : DATABASE SEARCH RESULTS: Selected Basic Overviews of Concussions from Government Sources

 

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MEDICAL: CONDITIONS: CONCUSSIONS :

REFERENCE TOOLS :

GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS :

DATABASE SEARCH RESULTS:

Selected Basic Overviews of Concussions from Government Sources

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WEBBIB1516

http://tinyurl.com/q8tavoy

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Selected Basic Overviews of Concussions from Government Sources

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

HEADS UP

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/

HEADS UP

Brain Injury Basics

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/basics/index.html

Helmet Safety

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/helmets/index.html

HEADS UP to Parents

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/parents/index.html

HEADS UP to Youth Sports

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/youthsports/index.html

HEADS UP to School Sports

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/highschoolsports/index.html

HEADS UP to Schools

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/schools/index.html

HEADS UP to Health Care Providers

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/providers/index.html

Sports Concussion Policies and Laws

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/policy/index.html

HEADS UP Resource Center

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/resources/index.html

Get Involved

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/getinvolved/index.html

HEADS UP Partners

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/partners/index.html

About HEADS UP

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/about/index.html

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HEADS UP Online Training Courses

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/resources/training.html

Online Concussion Training Course for Clinicians

Online Concussion Training Course for Youth Sports Coaches

Online Concussion Training Course for High School Sports Coaches

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Injury Prevention & Control: Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

http://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/

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Concussion

Also called: Brain concussion

Medline Plus

https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/concussion.html

On this page

Basics

Summary
Start Here
Latest News
Symptoms
Prevention and Risk Factors
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Research

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Summary
A concussion is a type of brain injury. It’s the most minor form. Technically, a concussion is a short loss of normal brain function in response to a head injury. But people often use it to describe any minor injury to the head or brain.

Concussions are a common type of sports injury. You can also have one if you suffer a blow to the head or hit your head after a fall.

Symptoms of a concussion may not start right away; they may start days or weeks after the injury. Symptoms may include a headache or neck pain. You may also have nausea, ringing in your ears, dizziness, or tiredness. You may feel dazed or not your normal self for several days or weeks after the injury. Consult your health care professional if any of your symptoms get worse, or if you have more serious symptoms such as

Seizures

Trouble walking or sleeping

Weakness, numbness, or decreased coordination

Repeated vomiting or nausea

Confusion

Slurred speech

Doctors use a neurologic exam and imaging tests to diagnose a concussion. Most people recover fully after a concussion, but it can take some time. Rest is very important after a concussion because it helps the brain to heal.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Start Here

Bang to the Brain: What We Know about Concussions From the National

Institutes of Health (National Institutes of Health)

Concussion (American Academy of Family Physicians)
Available in Spanish

Concussion (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)

Heads Up (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Latest News

Pricier Football Helmets Don’t Offer Extra Protection (03/01/2016, HealthDay)

Illegal Hits Play Big Role in Youth Ice Hockey Concussions (01/08/2016, HealthDay)

How You Can Protect Your Children from Brain Injury (01/01/2016, HealthDay)

More News on Concussion

Symptoms

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Concussion? (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Prevention and Risk Factors
Brain Injury Safety Tips and Prevention (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Related Issues

Can a Dietary Supplement Treat a Concussion? No! (Food and Drug Administration)
Available in Spanish

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)

FAQs about Baseline Testing among Young Athletes (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Available in Spanish

Post-Concussion Syndrome (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)

What Can I Do to Help Feel Better After a Concussion? (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Specifics

Concussion in Sports (American College of Sports Medicine) – PDF

Concussion in Winter Sports (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Sports Concussion vs. Military Concussion (Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center)

Health Check Tools

Concussions: What Do You Know? (Quiz) (Nemours Foundation)

Head Injury without Laceration (DSHI Systems)

Videos and Tutorials

Concussion Video – Encyclopedia
Available in Spanish

Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports Video (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Clinical Trials

ClinicalTrials.gov: Brain Concussion From the National Institutes of Health (National Institutes of Health)

ClinicalTrials.gov: Brain Injuries From the National Institutes of Health (National Institutes of Health)

ClinicalTrials.gov: Craniocerebral Trauma From the National Institutes of Health (National Institutes of Health)

Journal Articles

References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine)

Article: Clinical Risk Score for Persistent Postconcussion Symptoms Among Children With…

Article: Tolerable Risks? Physicians and Youth Tackle Football.

Article: Call for better advice on concussion in sports.

Concussion — see more articles

Find an Expert

American Academy of Neurology

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Available in Spanish

Children

Concussion ABCs: Learn How to Respond (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Concussions (Nemours Foundation)
Available in Spanish

Teenagers

Concussions (Nemours Foundation)
Available in Spanish

Concussions: Getting Better (Nemours Foundation)
Available in Spanish

School and Concussions (Nemours Foundation)
Available in Spanish

Sports and Concussions (Nemours Foundation)
Available in Spanish

Patient Handouts

Concussion
Available in Spanish

Concussion – adults – discharge
Available in Spanish

Concussion – child – discharge
Available in Spanish

Preventing head injuries in children
Available in Spanish

Topic Image

Illustration of the skull and jaw bones

MedlinePlus Email Updates

Get Concussion updates by email What’s this?
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MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA

Concussion Video

Concussion

Concussion – adults – discharge

Concussion – child – discharge

Concussion – what to ask your doctor – adult

Concussion – what to ask your doctor – child

Head CT scan

Preventing head injuries in children

Skull x-ray

Related Health Topics

Head Injuries

Traumatic Brain Injury

National Institutes of Health

The primary NIH organization for research on Concussion is

the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

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NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury

Concussion: Doug Flutie: “Be on the Safe Side.”

NIH Research on Concussion and the Brain

Sports and Concussion

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Concussion (Traumatic Brain Injury)

PUBMED Health

U.S. National Library of Medicine –
The World’s Largest Medical Library

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0024859/

Concussion (Traumatic Brain Injury)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a sudden injury from an external force that affects the functioning of the brain. It can be caused by a bump or blow to the head (closed head injury) or by an object penetrating the skull (called a penetrating injury).

PubMed Health Glossary
(Source: NIH – National Institute of Child Health and Human Development)

About Traumatic Brain Injuries
The most common form of TBI is concussion. A concussion can happen when the head or body is moved back and forth quickly, such as during a motor vehicle accident or sports injury.

Concussions are often called “mild TBI” because they are usually not life-threatening. However, they still can cause serious problems, and research suggests that repeated concussions can be particularly dangerous.

A person who has a TBI may have some of the same symptoms as a person who has a non-traumatic brain injury. Unlike TBI, this type of injury is not caused by an external force, but is caused by an internal problem, such as a stroke or infection.

Both types of injury can have serious, long-term effects on a person’s cognition and functioning…Read more about Traumatic Brain Injury NIH – National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

What works? Research summarized
Evidence reviews

Complications of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Veterans and Military Personnel: A Systematic Review [Internet]

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common condition, especially among military members. Twelve to 23 percent of service members returning from Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) experienced a TBI while deployed. Although various criteria are used to define TBI severity, the majority of documented TBI events among OEF/OIF/OND service members may be classified as mild in severity, or mTBI, according to the definition used by the Veterans Health Administration and Department of Defense (VA/DoD).

The evaluation and management of acute concussion differs in young children

BACKGROUND: There are many reasons why concussion in children needs to be considered different from adults. The Zurich (2008) recommendations on the management of concussion in children are restricted to children less than to 10 years of age. It does not include recommendations for children aged 5-10 years. The aim of this study is to review the current literature on (1) concussion assessment at the sideline and during recovery stages, especially in the age group 5-15 years, and (2) the management of concussion in children and adolescents.

Visual Dysfunction in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review [Internet]

In 2009, approximately 3.5 million people sought treatment related to a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States (U.S.), just over 1% of the U.S. population. Researchers estimate that approximately 15% of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) U.S. Service Members have incurred TBI during deployment. This equates to 390,000 of the 2.6 million Service Members who have deployed as of 2014. Given that intact visual functioning depends on portions of the brain interacting in complex ways, there are multiple potential mechanisms through which TBI can result in visual dysfunction. To provide relevant data for policymakers, optometrists, ophthalmologists, rehabilitation specialists, and others who provide services for Veterans with TBI history, we conducted a systematic review of the prevalence and types of visual dysfunction in individuals with a history of TBI.

See all (27)

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The Epidemiology of Sport-Related Concussion

National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)

The Epidemiology of Sport-Related Concussion
Daniel H. Daneshvar, MA, MD / PhD Graduate Student,a Christopher J. Nowinski, Co-Director, Co-Founder,b,h Ann McKee, Co-Director, Associate Professor of Neurology and Pathology,b,i and Robert C. Cantu, MD, Co-Director, Clinical Professor, Chief of Neurosurgery Service, Chairman, Director of Sports Medicine, Co-Director, Co-Founderb,c,d,e,f,g,h
Author information ? Article notes ? Copyright and License information ?

Introduction

Each year, an estimated 38 million children and adolescents participate in organized sports in the United States.(1) In addition, 170 million adults participate in physical activities, including sports.(2) Table 1 presents the number of high school and collegiate athletes participating in each sport from the 198283 season through the 200708 season.(3) Many of these activities are associated with an increased risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI).(4) In the United States, an estimated 1.7 million people sustain a TBI annually, associated with 1.365 million emergency room visits and 275,000 hospitalizations annually with associated direct and indirect costs estimated to have been $60 billion in the United States in 2000.(5, 6) Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control estimates that 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions occur in sports and recreational activities annually.(7) However, these figures vastly underestimate total TBI burden, as many individuals suffering from mild or moderate TBI do not seek medical advice.(5, 7)

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References

1. Report on Trends and Participation in Youth Sports. Stuart, FL: National Council of Youth Sports; 2001.

2. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: Exercise. CDC; 2006.

3. Cantu RC, Mueller FO. The prevention of catastrophic head and spine injuries in high school and college sports. Br J Sports Med. 2009 Dec;43(13):981986. [PubMed]

4. Mueller FO, Cantu RC. Catastrophic Sport Injury Research 26th Annual Report: Fall 1982-Spring 2008. National Center for Catastrophic Injury Research;Spring; 2008.

5. Faul M, Xu L, Wald MM, Coronado VG. Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations and Deaths 2002-2006. US Department of Health and Human Services; Mar, 2010.

6. Finkelstein E, Corso P, Miller T. The Incidence and Economic Burden of Injuries in the United States. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2006.

7. Langlois JA, Rutland-Brown W, Wald MM. The epidemiology and impact of traumatic brain injury: a brief overview. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2006 Sep-Oct;21(5):375378. [PubMed]

8. Concussion (mild traumatic brain injury) and the team physician: a consensus statement. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Feb;38(2):395399. [PubMed]

9. McCrory P, Meeuwisse W, Johnston K, et al. Consensus statement on concussion in sport–the 3rd International Conference on concussion in sport, held in Zurich, November 2008. J Clin Neurosci. 2009 Jun;16(6):755763. [PubMed]

10. Valovich McLeod TC, Bay RC, Heil J, McVeigh SD. Identification of sport and recreational activity concussion history through the preparticipation screening and a symptom survey in young athletes. Clin J Sport Med. 2008 May;18(3):235240. [PubMed]

11. Delaney JS, Lacroix VJ, Leclerc S, Johnston KM. Concussions among university football and soccer players. Clin J Sport Med. 2002 Nov;12(6):331338. [PubMed]

12. Field M, Collins MW, Lovell MR, Maroon J. Does age play a role in recovery from sports-related concussion? A comparison of high school and collegiate athletes. J Pediatr. 2003 May;142(5):546553. [PubMed]

13. Cusimano MD. Canadian minor hockey participants’ knowledge about concussion. Can J Neurol Sci. 2009 May;36(3):315320. [PubMed]

14. Notebaert AJ, Guskiewicz KM. Current trends in athletic training practice for concussion assessment and management. J Athl Train. 2005 Oct-Dec;40(4):320325. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

15. Covassin T, Elbin R, 3rd, Stiller-Ostrowski JL. Current sport-related concussion teaching and clinical practices of sports medicine professionals. J Athl Train. 2009 Jul-Aug;44(4):400404. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

16. Sarmiento K, Mitchko J, Klein C, Wong S. Evaluation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s concussion initiative for high school coaches: Heads Up: Concussion in High School Sports J Sch Health. 2010 Mar;80(3):112118. [PubMed]

17. Sawyer RJ, Hamdallah M, White D, Pruzan M, Mitchko J, Huitric M. High school coaches’ assessments, intentions to use, and use of a concussion prevention toolkit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s heads up: concussion in high school sports. Health Promot Pract. 2010 Jan;11(1):3443. [PubMed]

18. Hootman JM, Dick R, Agel J. Epidemiology of collegiate injuries for 15 sports: summary and recommendations for injury prevention initiatives. J Athl Train. 2007 Apr-Jun;42(2):311319. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

19. Mueller FO, Colgate B. Annual Survey of Football Injury Research. National Center for Catastrophic Injury Research; Feb, 2010.

20. Mueller FO, Cantu RC. Catastrophic Football Injuries Annual Report. National Center for Catastrophic Injury Research; 2009.

21. Powell JW, Barber-Foss KD. Traumatic brain injury in high school athletes. JAMA. 1999 Sep 8;282(10):958963. [PubMed]

22. Langburt W, Cohen B, Akhthar N, O’Neill K, Lee JC. Incidence of concussion in high school football players of Ohio and Pennsylvania. J Child Neurol. 2001 Feb;16(2):8385. [PubMed]

23. Gessel LM, Fields SK, Collins CL, Dick RW, Comstock RD. Concussions among United States high school and collegiate athletes. J Athl Train. 2007 Oct-Dec;42(4):495503. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

24. Boden BP, Tacchetti RL, Cantu RC, Knowles SB, Mueller FO. Catastrophic head injuries in high school and college football players. Am J Sports Med. 2007 Jul;35(7):10751081. [PubMed]

25. Broglio SP, Sosnoff JJ, Shin S, He X, Alcaraz C, Zimmerman J. Head impacts during high school football: a biomechanical assessment. J Athl Train. 2009 Jul-Aug;44(4):342349. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

26. Guskiewicz KM, McCrea M, Marshall SW, et al. Cumulative effects associated with recurrent concussion in collegiate football players: the NCAA Concussion Study. JAMA. 2003 Nov 19;290(19):25492555. [PubMed]

27. Covassin T, Swanik CB, Sachs ML. Epidemiological considerations of concussions among intercollegiate athletes. Appl Neuropsychol. 2003;10(1):1222. [PubMed]

28. Rechel JA, Yard EE, Comstock RD. An epidemiologic comparison of high school sports injuries sustained in practice and competition. J Athl Train. 2008 Apr-Jun;43(2):197204. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

29. Mueller FO, Cantu RC. Catastrophic Sport Injury Research 26th Annual Report: Fall 1982-Spring 2003. National Center for Catastrophic Injury Research;Spring; 2003.

30. Giannone L, Williamson TL. A philosophy of safety awareness. In: S GG, editor. American Association of Cheerleading Coaches and Administrators Cheerleading Safety Manual. Memphis, TN: UCA Publications Department; 2006. pp. 14.

31. Shields BJ, Smith GA. Cheerleading-related injuries to children 5 to 18 years of age: United States, 1990-2002. Pediatrics. 2006 Jan;117(1):122129. [PubMed]

32. Shields BJ, Smith GA. Cheerleading-related injuries in the United States: a prospective surveillance study. J Athl Train. 2009 Nov-Dec;44(6):567577. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

33. Schulz MR, Marshall SW, Yang J, Mueller FO, Weaver NL, Bowling JM. A prospective cohort study of injury incidence and risk factors in North Carolina high school competitive cheerleaders. Am J Sports Med. 2004 Mar;32(2):396405. [PubMed]

34. Shields BJ, Fernandez SA, Smith GA. Epidemiology of cheerleading stunt-related injuries in the United States. J Athl Train. 2009 Nov-Dec;44(6):586594. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

35. Singh S, Smith GA, Fields SK, McKenzie LB. Gymnastics-related injuries to children treated in emergency departments in the United States, 1990-2005. Pediatrics. 2008 Apr;121(4):e954960. [PubMed]

36. Emery CA, Hagel B, Decloe M, Carly M. Risk factors for injury and severe injury in youth ice hockey: a systematic review of the literature. Inj Prev. 2010 Apr;16(2):113118. [PubMed]

37. Emery CA, Meeuwisse WH. Injury rates, risk factors, and mechanisms of injury in minor hockey. Am J Sports Med. 2006 Dec;34(12):19601969. [PubMed]

38. Macpherson A, Rothman L, Howard A. Body-checking rules and childhood injuries in ice hockey. Pediatrics. 2006 Feb;117(2):e143147. [PubMed]

39. Hagel BE, Marko J, Dryden D, Couperthwaite AB, Sommerfeldt J, Rowe BH. Effect of bodychecking on injury rates among minor ice hockey players. CMAJ. 2006 Jul 18;175(2):155160. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

40. Yard EE, Comstock RD. Injuries sustained by pediatric ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey athletes presenting to United States emergency departments, 1990-2003. J Athl Train. 2006 Oct-Dec;41(4):441449. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

41. Dick R, Romani WA, Agel J, Case JG, Marshall SW. Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate men’s lacrosse injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2003-2004. J Athl Train. 2007 Apr-Jun;42(2):255261. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

42. Dick R, Lincoln AE, Agel J, Carter EA, Marshall SW, Hinton RY. Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate women’s lacrosse injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2003-2004. J Athl Train. 2007 Apr-Jun;42(2):262269. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

43. Mueller BA, Cummings P, Rivara FP, Brooks MA, Terasaki RD. Injuries of the head, face, and neck in relation to ski helmet use. Epidemiology. 2008 Mar;19(2):270276. [PubMed]

44. Levy AS, Hawkes AP, Hemminger LM, Knight S. An analysis of head injuries among skiers and snowboarders. J Trauma. 2002 Oct;53(4):695704. [PubMed]

45. Bridges EJ, Rouah F, Johnston KM. Snowblading injuries in Eastern Canada. Br J Sports Med. 2003 Dec;37(6):511515. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

46. Hentschel S, Hader W, Boyd M. Head injuries in skiers and snowboarders in British Columbia. Can J Neurol Sci. 2001 Feb;28(1):4246. [PubMed]

47. Dick RW. Is there a gender difference in concussion incidence and outcomes? Br J Sports Med. 2009 May;43 1:i4650. [PubMed]

48. Broshek DK, Kaushik T, Freeman JR, Erlanger D, Webbe F, Barth JT. Sex differences in outcome following sports-related concussion. J Neurosurg. 2005 May;102(5):856863. [PubMed]

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Polytrauma/TBI System of Care

Concussion Coach Mobile App

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

http://www.polytrauma.va.gov/ConcussionCoach.asp

Concussion Coach is a mobile phone application for Veterans, Servicemembers, and others who have experienced a mild to moderate concussion.  It provides portable tools to assess symptoms and to facilitate use of coping strategies.

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The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate ReleaseMay 29, 2014

FACT SHEET:

President Obama Applauds Commitments to Address
Sports-Related Concussions in Young People

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/05/29/
fact-sheet-president-obama-applauds-commitments-
address-sports-related-c

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http://tinyurl.com/z33dhl2

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Sports are one of the best ways to keep our kids active and healthy, but young people make nearly  250,000  emergency room visits each year with sport or recreation-related brain injuries. As a sports fan and a parent with two young daughters, President Obama believes we need to do more to protect the health and safety of our kids. Today, the President will host the first-ever White House Healthy Kids & Safe Sports Concussion Summit to advance research on sports-related youth concussions and raise awareness of steps to prevent, identify and respond to concussions in young people.

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The truth is we still do not know enough about the consequences of traumatic brain injuries, where its a hard knock on the playing field or head injury sustained by one of our troops serving abroad. Every mother and father, friend and family deserves to know everything we can about the best way to care for our young athletes and veterans and thats the core focus of todays White House Summit.

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Staying Active and Playing Safe

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Each day, hundreds of thousands of young athletes head out to fields, ice rinks and gymnasiums to practice and compete in a wide variety of sports. There is no doubt that sports are a great way for kids and teens to stay healthy, as well as to learn important leadership and team-building skills. At the same time, parents are increasingly concerned about the role of concussions in sports.  Concussions can have a serious effect on young, developing brains, and can cause short- and long-term problems affecting how a child thinks, acts, learns, and feels. While most kids and teens with a concussion recover quickly and fully, some will have symptoms that last for days, or even weeks, and a more serious concussion can last longer.

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Last fall, the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council published a report that found that there are gaps in our concussions research knowledge and that there is a startling lack of data on concussions, especially in youth sports.  The report also found that there is still a culture of resistance among athletes related to the self-reporting of concussions and the adherence to treatment plans once they experience a concussion.

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Advancing the Ball

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The President believes that we can and must do better.  Raising awareness of and better protecting children and student athletes from concussions, and better identifying and treating them when they do occur, requires a team approach and we must work with the professional sports community, youth sports programs, parents, school administrators, researches, athletes, coaches, trainers, military service members and other stakeholders to make this effort successful. We all have a role to play in helping to prevent, identify and respond to concussions so that young people can remain active and healthy.  And, we can all work together to ensure that when kids do experience concussion, they are covered thanks to the Affordable Care Act, which bans insurance companies from denying health coverage to kids and adults with pre-existing conditions, allows young adults to stay on their parents plans until their 26th birthday, and offers new, affordable health coverage options.

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That is why the White House Healthy Kids & Safe Sports Concussion Summit is bringing together key stakeholders to highlight new commitments, including new public-private partnerships, to increase research that will expand our knowledge of concussions and to provide parents, coaches, clinicians, and young athletes tools to better prevent, identify and respond to concussions.

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These commitments, many of which directly address some of the key recommendations of the IOM report, include:

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Expanding Research and Improving Data Collection

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The NCAA and the Department of Defense are jointly launching a $30 million effort to fund the most comprehensive clinical study of concussion and head impact exposure ever conducted and to issue an Educational Grand Challenge aimed at improving concussion safety behaviors in college sports and the military. This initiative aims to produce research on concussion risks, treatment and management through a multi-site longitudinal clinical study and advanced research projects.  Through an Educational Grand Challenge, the initiative aims to create novel and impactful evidence-based concussion education materials and solicit research proposals to identify key factors for affecting change in the culture and behavior of college student-athlete and other young adult populations with regard to concussions.

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The NFL is committing $25 million over the next three years to support projects and partnerships aimed at promoting youth sports safety, including support for new pilot programs to expand access to athletic trainers in schools, in conjunction with the National Athletic Trainers Association, and to support a Back to Sports program — a collaboration with the National PTA and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association — to hold information sessions across the country to educate parents about sports safety and the value of sports participation and an active lifestyle.

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The National Institutes of Health is announcing the launch of a new longitudinal research effort to detect, characterize, and measure the chronic effects of repetitive concussions to inform clinical trials aimed at preventing or slowing disease progression in the future.  NIH is being supported by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, starting with an initial investment of $16 million from its first Sports Health Program partner, the National Football League. This funding, together with grants announced at the end of last year, fulfill the $30 million commitment the NFL made to the NIH in 2012.   This fall, the NIH will convene public and private funders of concussion and TBI research, including NIH, the NFL, DoD, and NCAA, with the goal of supporting enhanced coordination among research efforts and better leveraging of public and private investments to accelerate research outcomes.

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The UCLA Steve Tisch BrainSPORT Program, with a $10 million investment from Steve Tisch, UCLAs Departments of Neurosurgery and Pediatrics will launch the UCLA Steve Tisch BrainSPORT Program to target sports concussion prevention, outreach, research and treatment for athletes of all ages, especially youth.  The program will focus on strategies such as community education events, including a planned Southern California youth concussion day for players, coaches, parents and trainers; a new fellowship program training the next generation of pediatric sports neurologists; longitudinal research studies to advance understanding of and treatment of concussion; and expanded treatment capacity through new multidisciplinary concussion clinics.  In addition, this commitment will support a planning initiative to inform the development of a national system to accurately determine the incidence of youth sports-related concussions.

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The National Institute of Standards and Technology will invest $5 million over five years as part of the Materials Genome Initiative, to work on tools to accelerate the development of advanced materials that can provide better protection against concussions for the athlete, the warfighter and others.  These efforts aim to advance the development of new materials including light-weight, structural composite, and active or smart materials for protective gear.

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Pop Warner Little Scholars will participate this season in a research project modeled on the High School RIO reporting system, which tracks concussions and concussion trends in high school sports, to improve tracking of concussions among young athletes.  100 Pop Warner teams will participate in the RIO pilot.  Pop Warner provides youth football and cheer and dance programs to approximately 425,000 young people ranging in age from 5 to 16 years old.  The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia will launch a comprehensive pediatric and adolescent concussion registry to enable CHOP researchers to assess data for thousands of children with concussions to improve understanding of concussions and their impact on child health.

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Education and Awareness for Parents, Coaches and Athletes

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Safe Kids Worldwide, in partnership with Johnson & Johnson, will host more than 200 sports safety clinics for parents, coaches and young athletes across the country, including education on concussions, and will release a research report this summer providing updated insights into the culture of youth sports today.  The Brain Injury Association of America in collaboration with SAP will build an online application to help students, parents and educators better understand when to return to class after a concussion through a software platform that allows students, parents, educators, coaches and medical treatment providers to communicate.

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USA Cheer will roll-out a new Head Injury Protocol to over 300,000 cheerleaders and their coaches this summer at clinics around the country to teach coaches and cheerleaders how to prevent, identify and seek treatment for any suspected head injuries.  USA Cheer and its partners, the American Association of Cheerleading Coaches and Administrators, the U.S. All-Star Federation and the National Federation of State High School Associations will release new, updated cheerleading safety guidelines to reduce head injuries in cheerleading.

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U.S. Soccer is establishing a Chief Medical Officer position to interface with the medical community and experts in the field of concussion management and prevention.   U.S. Soccer and Major League Soccer will jointly organize a first-of-its-kind Medical Summit to, among other topics, lead a coordinated effort on concussion management and prevention initiatives. They also will use their platforms to communicate PSAs and other concussion-related messages including through U.S. Mens and Womens National Team games, MLS games and special events, and other venues.

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The National Federation of State High School Associations will host a concussion summit this year focused on promoting best practices to minimize injury risks in high school athletes.  NFHS writes playing rules for high school level sports, reaching more than 19,000 high schools and more than 7.7. million participants in high school sports.  The National High School Athletic Coaches Association will use its summer  convention to provide education sessions on concussion for high school coaches and expand the concussion information on its Web site.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will promote the use of its new Heads Up to Parents app to help parents learn how to spot concussion symptoms and what to do if they think their child or teen has a concussion.  In response to the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation to evaluate education efforts, CDC will evaluate its Heads Up concussion education program to help ensure that its messages are best reaching parents, coaches and young athletes.  It also will support the evaluation of ‘return to play’ laws.

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Educating Health Care Providers

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The American Academy of Neurology will host its first multidisciplinary Sports Concussion Conference this summer and continue to support a national public education campaign to increase awareness of its clinical guidelines on sports concussions.   The American Psychological Association will produce a Web-based Concussions Toolkit as a resource for psychologists on concussions research and clinical information.  The American Academy of Pediatrics anticipates releasing an updated policy statement on sports-related concussion in children and adolescents in the fall of 2015.   The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will, by spring 2015, release the clinical guidelines it is developing for the appropriate diagnosis and management of children and teens with mild traumatic brain injury, including concussions, for use in doctor’s offices and emergency departments.  CDC has convened a Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Guideline Workgroup composed of leading clinical experts to support the development of these guidelines.

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Concussion

Health Direct Australia

http://www.healthdirect.gov.au/concussion

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Recognising concussion

NI Direct GOV UK

https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles/recognising-concussion

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Concussion and Head Injury Fact Sheet – State of New Jersey

http://www.nj.gov/education/aps/cccs/chpe/concussions/fact.pdf

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TBI Recovery Guide 5.13.08.pub – Michigan.gov Home

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdch/
TBI_Recovery_Guide_10.8.08_252053_7.pdf

OR

http://tinyurl.com/jyx6uxl

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Ohio Department of Health Concussion Information Sheet

For Interscholastic Athletics

http://athletics.cvcaroyals.org/documents/ 2016/1/11//ODH_ConcussionForm2014.pdf?id=6

OR

http://tinyurl.com/gl5yzyf

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Concussion in Youth Sports: Ohio’s Return-to-Play Law

**Ohios Return-to-Play Law went into effect on April 26th, 2013**

Ohio’s Youth Concussion Law

Quick Links

Medical Clearance to Return to Play Form

Ohio Youth Sports Concussion and Head Injury Guidelines Committee

Ohio Department of Health Concussion Information Sheet

Online Concussion Management Training

Ohios Return to Play Law: Frequently Asked Questions

Ohios Return to Play Law: What Coaches and Referees Need to Know

Ohios Return to Play Law: What Parent/Guardians Need to Know
Additional Concussion Resources

Concussion Information Sheet

http://www.healthy.ohio.gov/concussion.aspx

Concussion Information Sheet

Per ORC 3707.52 as enacted by Ohio HB 143 of the 129th General Assembly, the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) is required to create a concussion information sheet for participants in interscholastic activities and youth sports.

Interscholastic Activities:

As of April 26th, 2013, Ohio law (ORC 3313.539 and ORC 3314.03) prohibits schools from allowing a student to practice for or compete in interscholastic athletics (school sports) until the student has submitted this signed form stating that the student and the student’s parent or guardian have received the information contained in the sheet. PLEASE NOTE: This form should be submitted to your local school district and not ODH.

Interscholastic Student Athlete Concussion Information Sheet

Interscholastic Student Athlete Concussion Information Sheet – Spanish Version

Youth Sports Organizations:

Starting April 26th, 2013, Ohio law (ORC 3707.511) requires a youth sports organization to provide this sheet to the parent or guardian of an individual who wishes to practice for or compete in an athletic activity organized by the organization.

Youth Sports Organization Concussion Information Sheet

Youth Sports Organization Concussion Information Sheet –  Spanish Version

Online Concussion Management Training

Per ORC 3707.52 as enacted by Ohio HB 143 of the 129th General Assembly, ODH is required to post free training programs that train coaches and referees in recognizing the signs and symptoms of concussions and head injuries.

The three following free online trainings have been approved by ODH for coaches and referees:

1.  National Federation of State High School Associations Concussion in Sports – What you Need to Know:

http://nfhslearn.com/courses

This free on-line course is available through the NFHS. You will need to click the order here button and complete a brief registration form to take the course. Follow these steps to complete the course:

Click on the button that says, “please login to order.”  In the window that appears, click “Register Now”.

When your registration is complete you may “order” the free concussion course offered along the left hand side of the page.  Continue following prompts.  Although it may look like you’ll be charged for the course, there is no cost.

Once you have completed “checkout,” you’ll be able to take the free online course.

When you have completed and passed the course, you have the option of printing a certificate of completion.

2.  National Alliance for Youth Sports (NAYS) Concussion Training:

http://www.nays.org/additional-training/preview/concussion-training.cfm

This free online course is available to all coaches and parents. To register, pass the course and obtain a certificate of completion you will need to follow these steps:

Click the Sign Up button and complete the brief registration form to create a free account.

From your account you will want to select the Go to clinic link to begin.
On the overview page you will need to select the I want a certificate for this training button to satisfy the Ohio law and obtain a certificate of completion.

Answer all of the exam questions for each section. When complete, an Access Your Certificate link will appear under the More Resources tab for easy printability of your certificate.

Existing NYSCA coaches and PAYS parents can also add concussion training for free to their existing account.

3.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Heads Up Concussion in Youth Sports Training:

http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/HeadsUp/online_training.html

CERTIFICATES OF COMPLETION:

All three training courses offer a certificate of completion upon successful passage.

The NFHS course allows individuals and organizations to search for and track coaches who have completed the course. The search function allows for searches by date, name, state, city or school.
NAYS chapters can track coaches who have completed the course and are members of the NYSCA.  To find your own certificate of completion, log in to your free account again, click on the Go to clinic link for Concussion Training and select the Access Your Certificate link.

The CDC course does not allow you to search for or track course completion.  In order to print your certificate of completion, use the print button found within the training.  You will not be able to print the certificate using your tool bar or keyboard, and will be unable to return later to search for your certificate.

Frequently Asked Questions

Ohio’s Return to Play Law: Frequently Asked Questions (Updated 5.30.13) document provides detailed information regarding Ohio’s Return to Play Law.

More Information For Coaches, Referees and Parents

Coaches and Referees

Ohios Return to Play Law: What Coaches and Referees Need to Know – Youth Sports

Ohios Return to Play Law: What Coaches and Referees Need to Know – School Sports

Parents and Guardians

The following factsheets are intended to provide more information about the requirements of the law and are different from the ODH Concussion Information Sheets which must be distributed to parents, guardians and athletes by schools and youth sports organizations.

Ohios Return to Play Law: What Parent/Guardians Need to Know – Youth Sports

Ohio’s Return to Play Law: What Parent/Guardians Need to Know – School Sports

Additional Concussion Resources

Ohio Department of Health, Violence and Injury Prevention Program – Sports/Recreation Traumatic Brain Injuries

CDC Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports (English Version) (Spanish Version)

CDC Concussion Treatment and Management Materials for Health Care Providers

CDC Materials on Returning to School for Parents, School Nurses and Educators

Ohio Legislative Service Commission HB 143 Bill Analysis

Nationwide Children’s Hospital – Concussion Information Toolkits – For Athletes  |  For Coaches  | For Parents | For Educators | For School Administrators

Center for Concussion Rocky Mountain Youth Sports Medicine Institute – REAP Concussion Management Program

Ohio Injury Prevention Partnership – Sports Injury Prevention Grant Resource Guide

American Academy of Pediatrics Guidance on Returning to Learning After Concussion

PLEASE NOTE: The State of Ohio is not responsible for the content of external websites. A link to a non-governmental website does not constitute endorsement.

Contact Information

Ohio Department of Health
Injury Prevention Program
246 North High Street, 8th Floor
Columbus, OH 43215

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Guidelines for Concussion Management in the School Setting

The University of the State of New York

THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

Office of Student Support Services

Albany, New York 12234

June 2012

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/sss/schoolhealth/ schoolhealthservices/ConcussionManageGuidelines.pdf

OR

http://tinyurl.com/jfl6gyv

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Concussions

Ontario [Canada] Ministry of Health and Long Term Care

http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/public/programs/concussions/resources.aspx

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Can a Dietary Supplement Treat a Concussion? No!

United States Food and Drug Administration

http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm378845.htm

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Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE)

and the

Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC)

Concussion and Head Injury

Annual Review 2015-16

Required for all School Coaches in Connecticut

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/deps/concussion/ coaches_concussion_and_head_injury_annual_review_materials.pdf

OR

http://tinyurl.com/hbz84xj

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Sport related concussion and brain damage awareness

http://learning.gov.wales/news/sitenews/ sport-related-concussion-and-brain-damage/?lang=en

OR

http://tinyurl.com/helc6kj

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[PDF]sports concussion – The Scottish Government

http://www.gov.scot/Resource/0044/00441743.pdf

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DHEC: Student Athlete Concussions Law

South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control

http://www.scdhec.gov/Health/ ChildTeenHealth/Concussions/AthleteConcussionLaw/

OR

http://tinyurl.com/hofl9ov

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Concussion treatment and recovery

Better Health Channel

Victoria, Australia

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/
conditionsandtreatments/concussion-treatment-and-recovery

OR

http://tinyurl.com/h22tup4

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Concussion guidance

NI Direct

GOV.UK

https://www.deni.gov.uk/articles/concussion-guidance

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Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

(MTBI) Adopted May 18, 2010

Maine, United States

https://www1.maine.gov/education/sh/documents/concussion.pdf

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DATABASE SEARCH RESULTS FOR CONCUSSIONS AND BRAIN TRAUMA

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(concussion OR concussions OR “head trauma” OR “trauma to the head” OR “brain trauma” OR “trauma to the brain”)

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Net Gold and Sport Med Discussion Groups

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=
UTF-8#q=(concussion+OR+concussions+OR+%22head+trauma%22+OR+%22trauma+
to+the+head%22+OR+%22brain+trauma%22+OR+%22trauma+to+the+brain%22)
+AND+%22NET-GOLD%22+AND+%22TEMPLE.EDU%22&filter=0

OR

http://tinyurl.com/j4r423z

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SPORT-MED

https://www.google.com/#q=(concussion+OR+concussions+OR+%22head+trauma%22+
OR+%22trauma+to+the+head%22+OR+%22brain+trauma%22+OR+%22trauma+to+the+
brain%22)+AND+%22SPORT+MED%22+AND+%22JISC%22&filter=0

OR

http://tinyurl.com/zqbxuea

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.

Google Scholar

http://tinyurl.com/jlk9fvq

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Google Books

http://tinyurl.com/grpxswd

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Google Images

To get the most from this link, click on an image and then in the resulting black box insert click on View Page.  The resulting page provides that image and the context in which it appears on the source website.

http://tinyurl.com/hebqng2

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Google Videos

http://tinyurl.com/gtd6ycx

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Google Domain Limited Web Search (PUBMED)

http://tinyurl.com/grny7gj

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Google Domain Limited Scholar Search (PUBMED)

http://tinyurl.com/jgwefpk

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Google Domain Limited Web Search (SCIENCEDIRECT)

http://tinyurl.com/gla5dby

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Google Domain Limited Web Search (JSTOR)

http://tinyurl.com/zq2vrqb

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Google News

http://tinyurl.com/hklyhyw

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Google Domain Limited Web Search (NEWS)

http://tinyurl.com/zamtbyz

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Google Blog Search

http://tinyurl.com/hmwdky4

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Google Domain Limited Web Search (BLOGS)

http://tinyurl.com/j3qopyb

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TRIP Database

http://tinyurl.com/jgj7kp3

.

PogoFrog

http://tinyurl.com/z8sndyz

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WEBBIB1516

http://tinyurl.com/q8tavoy

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Sincerely,
David Dillard
Temple University
(215) 204 – 4584
jwne@temple.edu
http://workface.com/e/daviddillard

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Temple University and Google Sites Research Guides
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Copyright Research Guide
Copyright, Intellectual Property and Plagiarism Sources
http://guides.temple.edu/copyright-plagiarism
Fair Use
http://guides.temple.edu/fair-use

Blog
https://educatorgold.wordpress.com/

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http://tinyurl.com/78a4shn

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/neemers/

Twitter: davidpdillard

Temple University Site Map
https://sites.google.com/site/templeunivsitemap/home

Bushell, R. & Sheldon, P. (eds),
Wellness and Tourism: Mind, Body, Spirit,
Place, New York: Cognizant Communication Books.
Wellness Tourism: Bibliographic and Webliographic Essay
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http://tinyurl.com/o4pn4o9

Rail Transportation
https://groups.io/org/groupsio/RailTransportation

INDOOR GARDENING
Improve Your Chances for Indoor Gardening Success
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/IndoorGardeningUrban/

SPORT-MED
https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/sport-med.html
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sports-med/
http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/sport-med.html

HEALTH DIET FITNESS RECREATION SPORTS TOURISM
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/healthrecsport/info
http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/health-recreation-sports-tourism.html

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Please Ignore All Links to JIGLU
in search results for Net-Gold and related lists.
The Net-Gold relationship with JIGLU has
been terminated by JIGLU and these are dead links.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/30664
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Temple University Listserv Alert :
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https://sites.google.com/site/templeuniversitylistservalert/

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[SportMed] MEDICAL: CONDITIONS: CONCUSSIONS : REFERENCE TOOLS : GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS : DATABASE SEARCH RESULTS: Selected Basic Overviews of Concussions from Government Sources

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