TRANSPORTATION: STREETCARS : UNITED STATES: CITIES: CINCINNATI: Sources About Streetcars in Cincinnati: Bringing Lost Mobility to the Urban Core with Green Transit Development

 

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TRANSPORTATION: STREETCARS :

UNITED STATES: CITIES: CINCINNATI:

Sources About Streetcars in Cincinnati: Bringing Lost Mobility
to the Urban Core with Green Transit Development

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Sources About Streetcars in Cincinnati

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Cincinnati Streetcar becomes Cincinnati Bell Connector
with Naming Rights Sale

19 August 2016

Railway Gazette

http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/news/n-america/single-view/
view/cincinnati-streetcar-becomes-cincinnati-bell-connector- with-naming-rights-sale.html

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/jhfvj42

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USA: Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority announced on August 18 that Advertising Vehicles, its advertising sales contractor for the Cincinnati Streetcar, had signed a naming rights contract for the 58 km line that is due to open on September 9.

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Local telecoms company Cincinnati Bell will pay $340 000 per year for 10 years under the contract, with proceeds going towards operational expenditure. The service will be renamed the Cincinnati Bell Connector, and the fleet of five CAF Urbos trams will carry Cincinnati Bell graphics on the front, back, top and interior, replacing the current logo and livery. The 18 stops will also carry the companys branding. The contract does not exclude other advertising being sold inside and outside the vehicles.

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Here’s How US Regional Transit Agencies Impede the Development of Public Transport

August 18, 2016

By Jeff Wood

Transport USA

City Metric

http://www.citymetric.com/transport/here-s-how-us-
regional-transit-agencies-impede-development-public-transport-2327

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/jjgtx2m

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Back in 2013, in the middle of all the wrangling over the Cincinnati streetcar, the head of the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Peter Rogoff said something really interesting in his letter to the city and the regions transit agency.

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The Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA) is the fiduciary agent for the FTA funding which passes through to the city. The agency wanted to stay on the FTA’s good side since it receives other federal funding. The mayor was looking to kill the project for who knows what reasons he set his mind to, but this is really kind of an aside. Heres what Rogoff said in his letter, relayed by the Cincinnati Business Courier:

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Transit improvements are best deployed when they are governed and controlled under one roof.

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While FTA has been successful in supporting transit projects that are not controlled or operated by the region’s principal transit agency, we have found that there are a great many economies of scale that better serve the taxpayer when a fully staffed and experienced transit provider is involved from the very beginning.

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But isn’t that part of the problem? These massive regional transit agencies are typically stacked with suburban board members that don’t always have the core citys needs at heart. They are usually concocting schemes to extract money or service from the more transit-willing neighborhoods in the region, in order to have some sort of suburb-to-city dream bus or commuter rail line that costs a lot, but really doesn’t move the needle on changing mobility in a meaningful way. Either that, or they have to have an election, that includes precincts heavily-opposed to transit, and which sink ballot initiatives that pass in the city proper.

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So recently cities have been taking on the mantle of thinking up and building transit that works for them and their goals. Portland, Cincinnati, Austin, and others have all taken up planning for more urban transit options and with much different goals. At the start of the Portland Streetcar process, regional agency Tri-Met wanted nothing to do with it.

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Rightly or wrongly, the city streetcar movement is a function of the neglect that centre cities feel when it comes to regional transit priorities. The core might be the economic engine for the region, but the fiscal extraction continues.

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Rogoffs words were also a disappointing admission that transit agencies and their federal funders still don’t know their role in city building.

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Cincinnati Bell Connector Opens

12 September 2016

Railway Gazette

http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/news/n-america/single-view/view/ cincinnati-bell-connector-opens.html

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/zct2x95

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USA: A weekend of free travel marked the opening to passengers of the Cincinnati Bell Connector at midday on September 9.

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The 58 km tram route uses a pair of single tracks along parallel streets, running from Second Street at The Banks to Henry Street in Over-the-Rhine. There are 18 stops.

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Built by a joint venture of Messer, Prus and Delta Railroad, with stops designed by DNK Architects, the route is owned and funded by the city of Cincinnati and managed by the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority. Services are operated by Transdev under an operations and maintenance contract awarded last year.

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Two U.S. Streetcar Lines Celebrate Milestones

BY SANDY SMITH

OCTOBER 20, 2015

Next City

https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/ casablanca-tram-work-streetcars-kansas-city-cincinnati-dc

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/nbmyfgh

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Streetcar Projects Inch Closer to the Finish Line in Cincinnati, Kansas City
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In weve-been-waiting-for-this news, officials in both Cincinnati and Kansas City are marking milestones in the progress of their modern streetcar starter lines.

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In Cincinnati, the last segment of rail for the line from downtown to the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood was welded into place Friday, marking the completion of construction on time and within budget, according to a story in the Cincinnati Business Courier. Believe in Cincinnati, the citizens group that organized to keep the streetcar from being canceled in 2014, held a news conference to mark the occasion, but city officials said they would wait until the first streetcars arrived next month before celebrating.

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Meanwhile, in Kansas City, KCUR reports that the Kansas City Streetcar Authoritys storage and maintenance facility, E. Crichton Kite Singleton Yard, is 95 percent complete and that power to the streetcar lines overhead wires will be turned on this week. Hiring of the yards 20 maintenance workers will begin in November as the power supply is tested to make sure it is ready when the citys first cars arrive later this month.

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Both cities ordered streetcars from Spanish car builder CAF. The cars were to have been delivered to both cities by now, but production issues have delayed shipment; Kansas City has fined CAF USA for the delays in shipping its cars.

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Both lines are, or were to have been, initial phases of longer streetcar lines. Voters in Kansas City rejected a measure that would have expanded the streetcar taxing district over the summer. In Cincinnati, streetcar advocates are urging the city to move forward with Phase 1b of the starter line, which would extend the line farther uptown to the University of Cincinnati, but Mayor John Cranley prefers a wait-and-see approach that would hold off on planning the extension until the initial segment has met or surpassed expectations for ridership and development.

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D.C. Streetcar Will Definitely Be Running by Years End (Maybe)

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Heres what we know about the troubled H Street modern streetcar line in Washington, thanks to a recent story in the Washington Post: It will be free to ride for an initial period; how long that period will last is up in the air right now. After the free period ends, the fare will probably be the same as the successful DC Circulator buses the District of Columbia Department of Transportation runs: $1. Fares will be collected on a proof of payment basis, where roving inspectors check passengers to see that they have valid tickets. Cars will run every 15 minutes, a figure DDOT hopes to get down to every 12 minutes eventually. And it will definitely be picking up riders by the end of the year.

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That is, assuming all the safety testing Is have been dotted and Ts crossed.

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Streetcars of desire: why are American cities obsessed with building trams?

In the arms race of urban transit, streetcars are back in favour. Sean Marshall does a grand tour of Detroit, Cincinnati, Atlanta and Tampa to find out why

The Guardian

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/feb/20/ streetcars-of-desire-why-are-americans-obsessed-with-building-trams

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/hnsw8gf

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Torontos streetcar system, originally designed for a much smaller, pre-automobile city, quickly became a nuisance to ride. In rush-hour traffic, streetcars are slow, crowded, unreliable and prone to the dreaded short-turn  where they turn back before reaching their destination, in an attempt to stick to the schedule. What seemed unique and exciting as a child quickly became a hassle for the regular user.

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And yet, Torontos streetcars  better known as trams in Europe  are an integral part of city life here. Nearly 300,000 daily passengers are served by the 250-strong fleet, with some routes scheduled to run at two-minute intervals during peak times. In Toronto, as in Amsterdam, Melbourne and Prague, trams are an essential part of the urban transport system  but why exactly? To tackle my long-held skepticism of Americas streetcar projects, I determined to take a road trip from Toronto to Miami to visit four streetcar cities: Detroit, Cincinnati, Atlanta and Tampa.

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Clearly, streetcars do offer some advantages over buses. They provide a smoother ride, can carry more passengers (the TTC would require three buses to provide the same capacity as the one new, low-floor streetcar currently being added to the fleet), and run on clean electricity. They arent any slower than comparable bus routes on other streets  and, of course, theyre charming. Arguably, the streetcars of Toronto are equivalent to New Yorks yellow cabs or the gondolas of Venice, an internationally recognised symbol of the city.

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After the second world war, however, most North American cities abandoned their streetcar networks as ridership declined, car ownership soared, and the cost to renew streetcar infrastructure  footed mostly by cash-strapped private transit operators  proved too steep.

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Yet by the late 1980s, streetcar lines were once again popping up in cities across the country. Originally, many of these new lines were short, vintage streetcar routes, mimicking New Orleans famous St Charles Streetcar line. These heritage streetcars use antique or replica equipment and were mainly intended to cater to tourists, or to support downtown commerce or redevelopment.

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Portlands streetcar, opened in 2001, was the first new, modern streetcar system built in North America, and the operation  separate from the older Tri-Met light rail system  features sleek low-floor trams running on downtown streets. The Portland service was not designed so much to appeal to tourists, but part of a strategy to foster redevelopment of its central core and inner city neighbourhoods.

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Today, the Portland system serves 20,000 riders daily. In 2007, it was credited in the New York Times for spurring $2.4bn in new commercial and residential projects in the Pearl District and South Waterfront, though some critics claim that innovative zoning regulations and local demand should take most of the credit.

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Seattle soon followed Portlands lead and at the time of writing, Tacoma, Washington, Salt Lake City, Tuscon and Atlanta have also opened new modern streetcar lines, while Washington DC, Kansas City, Cincinnati, Detroit, St Louis, Milwaukee, and Charlotte, North Carolina are building or planning their own.

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So why are American cities now rushing to build streetcars? According to prominent transit advocate Jarrett Walker, a Portland native, streetcars attract more riders than buses. Theyre fun to ride, and quieter and cleaner than diesel buses. According to Walker, politicians and planners in these cities hope that the pleasant experience of riding the streetcar will make people value transit as a whole, as well as making downtown a more attractive place to live, shop, work and play. But he also argues that streetcars are not fulfilling the role of providing quality transit.

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CAF Delivers Trams to Two US Cities

02 November 2015

Railway Gazette

http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/news/n-america/single-view/ view/caf-delivers-trams-to-two-us-cities.html

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/gn2turc

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USA: The first vehicles for the Cincinnati and Kansas City streetcar lines have reached their respective cities from CAF USAs Elmira factory in New York state.

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The first of five Urbos 3 trams for Cincinnati arrived on October 30, with the first of four Urbos 3 cars for Kansas City arriving in that city on November 2.

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Both trams are 100% low-floor three-section vehicles. In October 2013 Kansas City announced that it would place an order on the back of Cincinnatis $22m contract awarded earlier that year.

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Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Dynamic Testing Begins on Cincinnati Streetcar

Written by  Keith Barrow

International Railway Journal

http://www.railjournal.com/index.php/north-america/ dynamic-testing-begins-on-cincinnati-streetcar.html

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/o6hoxxz

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CINCINNATTI Streetcar marked a milestone in the project to return trams to the city’s streets on November 10, when the first of five LRVs being supplied by CAF ran under its own power for the first time on the 5.8km line.

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The three-section low-floor vehicles are being assembled at CAF’s Elmira plant in New York state and the second LRV is due to be delivered next month, which will enable power tests to be carried out with more than one vehicle in operation. The three remaining vehicles will be delivered in January and February.

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Cincinnati Streetcar Construction Contract Signed

16 July 2013

Railway Gazette

http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/single-view/view/ cincinnati-streetcar-construction-contract-signed.html

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/z62dxzz

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USA: The main construction contract for the 58 km first phase of the Cincinnati Streetcar project was signed by the city council and the MPD joint venture of Messer, Prus and Delta Railroad on July 15, enabling the council to issue a notice to proceed.

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Utility relocation works for the tram project are already underway. Notice to proceed with the main works had been planned for April 8, and the delay has led to a $492 933 increase in the price of the contract, which is now $714m. The council said this ‘reasonable’ increase includes higher materials, labour and equipment costs.

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The planned opening date has also been put back from April 2 2016 to September 15 2016.

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Cincinnati Bell Connector – Streetcar – City of Cincinnati

http://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/streetcar/

CINCINNATI BELL CONNECTOR MENU

Design and Route

Streetcar Safety

Charter a Cincinnati Bell Connector Streetcar Vehicle

Background and Benefits

Cincinnati Bell Connector Funding

Documents and References

Documents and References

Latest Progress Updates
Each month, the streetcar project team provides a progress report to City Council as well as an update presentation to City Council’s Major Transportation & Regional Cooperation Committee.

August 2016 – Major Transportation Committee Update
June 2016 – Monthly Report
Archived Monthly Reports

Latest Monthly Stakeholder Presentation
Each month, the streetcar project team hosts a Streetcar Construction Stakeholders Meeting.  Meetings are open to the public and provide a quick way for citizens and stakeholders to get the latest news on upcoming construction activities.

February 2016 – Construction Stakeholders Presentation

NEPA – Environmental Assessment
In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the City conducted an Environmental Assessment (EA) and a Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) for the Cincinnati Streetcar Project. A Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) was issued on June 10, 2011.

Environmental Assessment (EA)
Supplemental Environmental Assessment
Finding Of No Significant Impact (FONSI)
Appendix To FONSI
Addendum To FONSI

Feasibility Studies
The Cincinnati Streetcar Feasibility Study was conducted by HDR Decision Economics and validated by the University of Cincinnati’s Economic Center for Education and Research. This study examines the factors of land use, traffic engineering, environmental impact, and cost in order to determine the practicability of a streetcar in Cincinnati. Additionally, the Feasibility Study measures the economic benefits to the community from such an investment.

Study
Economic Analysis
Benefit-Cost Analysis Appendix – TIGER I Grant Application (Sept. 2009)
Benefit-Cost Analysis Appendix – TIGER II Grant Application (Aug. 2010)
Benefit-Cost Analysis Appendix – TIGER III Grant Application (Oct. 2011)
The Economic Case For The Cincinnati Modern Streetcar (March 2011)
Below is a link to the maps included in the study, which cover alternate route and possible future extensions.

Appendices Map
Below is a link to the University of Cincinnati’s assessment of the 2007 Feasibility Study.

An Assessment of the Cincinnati Streetcar Study
In 2009, HDR presented the Cincinnati Streetcar Uptown Connector Feasible Alternatives Study, an assessment which focuses on the technical evaluation of alternative routes connecting Downtown and Uptown.

Uptown Feasibility Study
CINCINNATI BELL CONNECTOR MENU
Design & Route
Streetcar Safety
Charter a Cincinnati Bell Connector Streetcar Vehicle
Background & Benefits
Cincinnati Bell Connector Funding
Documents & References
June 2016 Monthly Report
Major Transportation and Regional Cooperation – August 2016
April – May 2016 Monthly Report
May 2016 MT&RC Presentation
March 2016 Monthly Report
February 2016 – Monthly Report
January 2016 – Monthly Report
Major Transportation Committee – March 2016
Major Transportation Committee – February 2016
December 2015 – Monthly Report
February 2016 Stakeholders
January 2016 Stakeholders
SORTA Community/Stakeholder Safety Presentation for Kids
SORTA Community/Stakeholder Safety Presentation
Streetcar Stakeholders and Community Meeting – December
Operations & Maintenance Update – December 2015
Major Transportation Meeting – December 8, 2015
Streetcar Stakeholder Meeting – November 17, 2015
Major Transportation Meeting – November 10
November 2015 Monthly Report
September – October 2015 Monthly Report
August 2015 Monthly Report
July 2015 Monthly Report
September 15, 2015 – Major Transportation Committee Update
September 2015 Stakeholders Update
Streetcar June 2015 Monthly Report
Stakeholders Update – August 2015
May 2015 Monthly Report
August 4, 2015 Major Transportation
Frequently Asked Questions

Contact Us

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Design and Route

http://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/streetcar/design-route/

Streetcar Route: Banks to CBD to OTR
The streetcar route is 3.6 miles long.

It will travel on a loop from Second Street (at The Banks on the riverfront) to Henry Street (just north of Findlay Market in Over the Rhine).

Popular destinations between these points include:

Government Square
Fountain Square
Contemporary Arts Center
Public Library
Aronoff Center
JACK Cincinnati Casino
Gateway Quarter
School for the Creative and Performing Arts
Music Hall
Washington Park .

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Streetcars in Cincinnati

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streetcars_in_Cincinnati

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Streetcars were the main form of public transportation in Cincinnati, Ohio, at the end of the 19th century and the start of the 20th century.[2] The first electric streetcars began operation in 1889,[3] and at its maximum, the streetcar system had 222 miles (357 km) of track and carried more than 100 million passengers per year. A very unusual feature of the system was that cars on some of its routes traveled via inclined railways to serve areas on hills near downtown. With the advent of inexpensive automobiles and improved roads, transit ridership declined in the 20th century and the streetcar system closed in 1951.[3][4]

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Construction of a new streetcar system, now known as the Cincinnati Bell Connector, began in 2012. Consisting initially of a single route, the new system opened on September 9, 2016.[5][6]

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Contents

1       Original system
1.1     Use of inclines
1.2     Decline and closure
2       21st century system
3       See also
4       Notes
5       References

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Cincinnati Bell Connector

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cincinnati_Bell_Connector

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This article is about the modern system that opened in 2016. For this historic system,

see Streetcars in Cincinnati.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streetcars_in_Cincinnati

For the never-built system,

see MetroMoves.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MetroMoves

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The Cincinnati Bell Connector, previously known as the Cincinnati Streetcar, is a streetcar system in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States. The system opened to passengers on September 9, 2016.[2] The streetcar operates on a 3.6-mile (5.8 km)[1] loop from The Banks, Great American Ball Park, and Smale Riverfront Park through Downtown Cincinnati and north to Findlay Market in the northern edge of the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood. Future extensions have been proposed to the Uptown area, home to the University of Cincinnati, the regional hospitals, and the Cincinnati Zoo; and to Northern Kentucky.

The project faced opposition on several occasions after being first proposed in 2007. Challenges included ballot initiatives to stop the project in 2009 and 2011, opposition from members of Cincinnati City Council, Governor John Kasich, and Mayor John Cranley (elected in 2013). However, both of the anti-rail ballot initiatives were rejected by voters, and a pro-streetcar majority was elected to City Council in 2011, allowing the project to move forward. Naming rights to the system were purchased by Cincinnati Bell in a $3.4 million, 10-year deal in August 2016.[3]

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Contents

1       History
1.1     Context
1.2     Feasibility study
1.3     Votes and political involvement
1.3.1   2009 referendum
1.3.2   2011 referendum
1.4     Construction begins
1.4.1   Construction pauses after 2013 election
1.5     Opening
2       Route
2.1     Possible extensions
2.1.1   Uptown Connector
2.1.2   Newport extension
3       Cost and funding
4       Possible benefits and drawbacks
5       Equipment
6       Commemorative beers
7       See also
8       References
9       External links

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Cincinnati Bell Connector

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First Cincinnati CAF streetcar being towed along track during testing in Nov 2015.jpg
Testing of the first streetcar in November 2015
Overview
Owner   City of Cincinnati
Locale  Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.
Transit type    Streetcar
Number of lines 1
Number of stations      18[1]
Operation
Began operation September 9, 2016
Operator(s)     SORTA
Character       Street running
Number of vehicles      5 CAF Urbos 3
Technical
System length   3.6 mi (5.8 km) (roundtrip)
Track gauge     1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1/2 in) standard gauge
Electrification 750 V DC, overhead wires

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Streetcars in North America

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streetcars_in_North_America

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Electric streetcars or trolley(car)s (North American English for the European word tram) were once the chief mode of public transit in hundreds of North American cities and towns. Most of the original urban streetcar systems were either dismantled in the mid-20th century or converted to other modes of operation, such as light rail. Today, only Toronto still operates a streetcar network essentially unchanged in layout and mode of operation.

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Older surviving lines and systems in Boston, Cleveland, Mexico City, Newark, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and San Francisco were often infrastructure-heavy systems with tunnels, dedicated right of way, and long travel distances, or have largely rebuilt their streetcar systems as light rail systems. About 22 North American cities, starting with Edmonton, Calgary and San Diego, have installed new light rail systems, some of which run along historic streetcar corridors. A few recent cases feature mixed-traffic street-running operation like a streetcar. Portland, Oregon, Seattle, and Salt Lake City have built both modern light rail and modern streetcar systems, while Tucson and Atlanta have built new modern streetcar lines. A few other cities and towns have restored a small number of lines to run heritage streetcars either for public transit or for tourists; many are inspired by New Orleans’ St. Charles Streetcar Line, generally viewed as the world’s oldest continuously operating streetcar line.

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Contents

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1       History
1.1     Omnibuses and horsecars
1.2     Early power
1.3     Electrification
1.4     Growth
1.5     Strikes
1.6     Decline
1.6.1   Purported conspiracies
1.7     Renaissance
1.7.1   Light rail
1.7.2   Heritage and modern streetcars
1.7.3   Transportation vs. development
2       Surviving first-generation streetcar systems
3       New second-generation streetcar systems
3.1     Portland, Oregon
3.2     Seattle and Tacoma, Washington
3.3     In development
3.3.1   Under construction
3.3.2   Planned or proposed
4       Heritage streetcar systems
4.1     Systems offering regular public transit
4.2     Recently closed systems
4.3     List of primarily tourist heritage systems in North America
5       Museums
6       See also
6.1     General articles
6.2     System lists
6.3     Specific systems
6.3.1   Operating
6.3.2   Not operating
6.4     Car builders and types
6.5     Structures
6.5.1   Standing
6.5.2   Not standing
7       References
8       External links

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List of streetcar systems in the United States

Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ List_of_streetcar_systems_in_the_United_States

OR

http://tinyurl.com/znqczqg

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Cincinnati Streetcars FROM Google Scholar

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&q=cincinnati+AND+
%28streetcar+OR+streetcars+OR+trolley+OR+trolleys+OR+trolleybus+
OR+%22light+rail%22+OR+trolleybuses+OR+tram+or+
trams%29&btnG=&as_sdt=1%2C39&as_sdtp=

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A shorter URL for the above link:

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http://tinyurl.com/z85qyzv

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Cincinnati Streetcars FROM Google Images

http://tinyurl.com/zxjzkkc

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Cincinnati Streetcars FROM Google Domain Limited Web Search (IMAGES)

http://tinyurl.com/jgzlyxx

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Cincinnati Streetcars FROM YouTube

http://tinyurl.com/jofyx2e

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Cincinnati Streetcars FROM Google Domain Limited Web Search (VIDEOS)

http://tinyurl.com/zumx9tv

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Selected Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWFTvFjPC-w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89gBeY4Y7Qg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rnI-hS5tlmc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQkUvEXh-vM&list=PLqWc9tu2KSUlSoR6dm2bfUWIp1htYFALL

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9aYQrMoRjrc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9aYQrMoRjrc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ta0rbLFWaBo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqXwfkZjYec

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Cincinnati Streetcars FROM Google Books

http://tinyurl.com/hvj3n68

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The complete articles may be read at the URLs provided for each.

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WEBBIB1617

http://tinyurl.com/gtdzaq3

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Sincerely,
David Dillard
Temple University
(215) 204 – 4584
jwne@temple.edu
http://workface.com/e/daviddillard

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Bushell, R. & Sheldon, P. (eds),
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Attachments area
Preview YouTube video Cincinnati Street Car Update July 2016

Cincinnati Street Car Update July 2016

Preview YouTube video New Cincinnati Bell Connector Streetcar Line, First Day Of Public Rides!

New Cincinnati Bell Connector Streetcar Line, First Day Of Public Rides!

Preview YouTube video Cincinnati 2227

Cincinnati 2227

Preview YouTube video Friends of Philadelphia Trolleys Day at the Baltimore Streetcar Museum

Friends of Philadelphia Trolleys Day at the Baltimore Streetcar Museum

Preview YouTube video Cincinnati Streetcar

Cincinnati Streetcar

Preview YouTube video Traveling Cincinnati by streetcar

Traveling Cincinnati by streetcar

Preview YouTube video Could the streetcar expand to Price Hill?

Could the streetcar expand to Price Hill?
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TRANSPORTATION: STREETCARS : UNITED STATES: CITIES: CINCINNATI: Sources About Streetcars in Cincinnati: Bringing Lost Mobility to the Urban Core with Green Transit Development

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